EMBERA’S OF PANAMA

An hour and a half drive outside of Panama City, and a 50 minute boat ride up the Chagres River in a dug out canoe, takes you to an Embera village. The Embera are an indigenous group of people from the Central / South American region. Their village along the Changres is within a protected rainforest. Void of most modern luxuries like electricity, the villagers find other ways to fill up their day.

Jordan free hoops…

Dirty Dishes…

The woman below is a volunteer for the Peace Corps. She lives in the Embera village and helps them with day to day activities…

Here she shows two possible floor plans to build cooking facilities attached to the school, at the top of the hill…

Women preparing baskets from large leaves, to hold our lunch…

Fried fish and plaintains for lunch…

After lunch, we entered into a conversation about the village. As we were talking I looked over and caught this old lady casually cutting her toe nails with the prep knife 😛

On a short hike through the forest, an elder showed us the different plants and trees they use for varying treatments in the village. Plants that can treat anything from poisonous snake bites to herbal forms of novocaine were found along this short trail. Here the elder was showing us a plant that is used in a tea as a natural form of viagra…

This tree produces a sap that can be rubbed on your chest to relieve congestion…

Woman in the early stages of weaving a basket…

scenic river shot with a smudge from a trip to Milan that never seems to go away…

On the way back to the city we stopped off to the side of the road for some repackaged homemade hot sauce and aloholic coconut drink (rear in Coca Cola bottles)…


8 thoughts on “EMBERA’S OF PANAMA

  1. Very very very cool post man! 🙂 Beats clubbing in BKK any day of the week! Hope all is well man, take care and be in touch!
    Yo
    T

  2. i got to say i really enjoy your painting, and your style analysis;
    i also got to say this kind of “exotic touristic adventure ” make me mad. humans are not an atraction.

    • I can relate to what you are saying. Although, one of the positives of traveling is exposing yourself to ways of life different from your own. The Embera people are in full control of their lives and support themselves from tourist visits.

  3. I learned a lot from these Indians, I got mad respects especial the colors they use, this is where my color scheme came from that I use in my art. Don’t tell nobody.

    They been doing graff for made years tell them to take you to the underground caves, where they do ceremonies you will bug out cuz.

    you have these 3 tribes:

    The Ngöbe Buglé
    The Kunas
    Emberá Wounan

    My dude your making me home sick for real.

    One love.
    Hajji

  4. Hi I went to visit them once but it was 3 years ago and I was a cruise director on a luxurious boat, so a very quick back and forth visit. Not the best way to get to know them. I’m going back in a couple weeks to shoot a scene about their dance, included in my feature film about dance around the world. I’m trying to find out how I can stay with them a few days without any guide. Any suggestion. The girl from Peace corps was living there, where ? In one of their huts ? Thank you very much for your help.

  5. It sadden my heart to know the real purpose of their visit, I do believe your people already robed their gold and exotic birds, you made a profit, did you find anything else. The Cunas had must
    of their treasure returned to them found in America, I’m sure you know the story. I was born a few
    miles from their, and I have seen what your visits have done, do you think you can convert every
    Indian to your destructive life style, now that you’re finished with the American Indians, are you
    unable to find a white virgin island?????

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